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  Physics: Father and son sent a toy into the space
   
   
 
 
 
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26th Sep 2012, 12:34 AM
Great video where the father builds a weather balloon to send his son's favorite Stanley the train toy to the very edge of the space.



Balloon was equipped with a HD camera and old cell phone with GPS to help recover the balloon when it came back to the Earth.



And now for the question: What makes weather balloons travel so high into the stratosphere, which is situated between 6 miles (10km) and 30 miles (50 km) above the surface of Earth?

First to answer correctly will get 20 Tokens added to their account.

changed: mat (26th Sep 2012, 1:47 PM)
 
 
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26th Sep 2012, 1:36 AM
Hydrogen?
 
 
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26th Sep 2012, 1:46 AM
Yes, helium can also be used. OK, Sheeva 20 tokens are already added to your account.

And because we are feeling generous, can anyone tell me what is the official record for the highest balloon flight? When, who and where did they do it? Again, 20 tokens


 
 
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26th Sep 2012, 5:36 AM
The highest altitude ever achieved by one such unmanned research balloon was 51,820 meters.

This balloon was launched from Chico,California in 1972.

 
 
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26th Sep 2012, 1:33 PM
Not quite Mukarachi, this was the 2nd highest altitude reached by a balloon. We still need the all time record.
 
 
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26th Sep 2012, 3:01 PM
In 2002 an ultra-thin-film balloon named BU60-1 made of polyethylene film 3.4 µm thick with a volume of 60,000 m³ was launched from Sanriku Balloon Center.

The balloon ascended at a speed of 260 m per minute and successfully reached the altitude of 53.0 km (173,900 ft), breaking the previous world record set in 1972.
 
 
 
   
   
 
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